Friday, October 30, 2009

Fractal and flabellate.

If you click on the above image to make it larger, and then tilt your head sideways, the nicely yellow ginkgo against a blue sky looks a little like a fractal design. The coolness of ginkgos knows no bounds. The reason you have to turn your head sideways is because the picture wants to appear in portrait, but the fractal-like effect is better seen in landscape. This unwanted 90 degree rotation sometimes happens when the picture is taken with the camera pointed straight up or straight down. It is a case of smart camera out-smarting itself, and me too.

A goldenrod interlude. Interestingly, no longer golden.


And back to golden ginkgo, a fractal tree with flabellate* leaves.

*fan-shaped. One of those great biological adjectives.

7 comments:

Garden Lily said...

Ha! I relate to your comment about devices nowadays out-smarting themselves. After transferring my photos to the computer, I view & rotate them with the standard Windows Picture and Fax Viewer. Seems to work - they stay rotated. I refuse to use any photo viewing software, since they typically rotate only within themselves, but not the actual file.

Hugh said...

Lily, Thanks, I'll try that. I've been trying with Photoshop, which has no effect.

Seabrooke said...

I remember discussing the photo-rotating problem some time ago here. My problem was always with Flickr. Just the other day I discovered in the options section a little checkbox under the question "Auto-rotate photos?" that said "Yes, please!". I promptly said "No, thanks!" and unchecked it. And have had no problems since. Could there be something like that buried deep in one of your options menus?

The ginkgo tree is neat. Nature makes such cool patterns.

Seabrooke said...

That's the options of Flickr (or in your case, Blogger), not the camera, just in case the comment was confusing. Or maybe it just seemed confusing to me because it's quarter to three am and I should be in bed...

Hugh said...

Seabrooke,

I think you're right. Blogger must recognize something in the file and rotate it.

Karen said...

Flabellate, sounds like a vaguely naughty word. I think gingko trees have kind of a nutty shape, they don't really look like other trees. Maybe it's the fractal effect! They do have the coolest leave, I hope to remember that term. I'm still trying to figure out how to work "haptera" into a conversation somehow.

Hugh said...

Karen, I expect that sooner or later it will become the name of a new model of car. The Nissan Haptera.