Friday, December 11, 2009

Great Blue Heron, adaptable.

This young heron has adopted the pond at Garden City Park as its winter home. This past week, the weather threw it a curve. Ice. The pond is completely frozen. Where will the bird find food?

The heron hears trickling, or perhaps sees a reflected flicker in the outflow drain, where there is adequate current to maintain a small channel of open water. Those bars are close enough together to keep out adventurous children, but the heron's serpentine neck is perfectly adapted to deal with such obstacles.

Snap! A goldfish. Clever bird.

6 comments:

jeansgarden said...

There's a great blue heron that fishes in the river near my house in the summer. I never get tired of looking at these birds, and when I see it while out on my morning walk, it always feels like a benediction on the day. -Jean

randomtruth said...

I'm reading a book called "California's Frontier Naturalists," and evidently, the natives reported, and early explorers verified, that GBHs are quite delicious. Not sure that does little goldie any good though. :)

Sally said...

Amazing photos--great job catching this story of my favorite bird! It's truly incredible, but then we never give them enough credit, do we?

Thanks also for the link to my "coop starlings" the other day. At first I thought someone was going to confirm my observation!

A benediction, indeed, Jean!

Hugh said...

Jean, They are common here because of several nearby heronries and year-round food sources, but even so are endlessly interesting--and apparently delicious too (See RT's comment.)

RT, Wow, really? There's not a lot of meat there. Plus they eat, well, anything. I guess we'll never know, but I'll keep in mind that they are delicious in case of apocalypse, etc.

Sally, Thanks. Yes, they are great birds. And you're most welcome for the link. It was a cool/funny observation.

Tatyana@MySecretGarden said...

Wow! Clever bird, indeed! Great shots!

randomtruth said...

It was the naturalist Emilio Botta that wrote about them. It was a French expedition though, so perhaps that explains it. ;)

But as you mentioned - always good to know for the upcoming zombie apocalypse.