Wednesday, October 23, 2013

A measure of success, but at what cost?

It's been more than a week since the last observation.  Beave got the tree to topple, but has yet to achieve a clean cut.

It must be really hard to do this in the dark.  With your teeth.

The tree, a willow, has sort of sagged onto a footpath.  I'm pretty sure this will be noticed.  I fear beave will soon become rodenta non grata. 

5 comments:

Susannah Anderson said...

"... onto a footpath ..." Oops!
Another beaver war starting up. I hope your beave is as persistent as ours are.

Hugh said...

Susannah,

I wonder how the Parks people will deal with this. They make a nature preserve, plant locally appropriate trees, and then a beaver comes and chops them down. What does one do? Me? I'm pro-rodent.

Susannah Anderson said...

In our local park, Cougar Creek, the people are cutting down the trees so the beaver won't get a chance. Sort of counter-productive, I think.

Hugh said...

Susannah,

Whuh? That's mean-spirited (and dumb). It's not that expensive or difficult to put wire mesh around the trees, which is done at Reifel and Burnaby Lake and probably lots of other places.

Susannah Anderson said...

It is dumb. I talked to one of the neighbours; he was angry at the beavers because, he said, they were dangerous; a tree could fall on someone's head any time. There are a couple of trees with wire mesh, but the rest have either been felled, or are "protected" by useless chains on posts, on the pathway side only, of course.
Last time we were there, a couple of weeks ago, people had felled good trees along the upper creek, and scraped off all the topsoil on either side, leaving a muddy trickle in the middle, clogged with garbage. No sign of the beaver dam that had been there a few months ago.
I'm almost hoping the beavers move downstream; there are some good spots in the canyon with no people in climbing distance.
But I'd also like to see the beavers win this war, and own the lake and the creek.